Tuesday, March 29, 2005

Free Market Pharmacists?

What to do about pharmacists who refuse to dispense birth control, and/or who steal the customers' bc prescriptions? One solution: Let the market [as opposed to government regulations] decide. Make sure to read the comments.

4 Comments:

At 4:08 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Health care personnel should have the right to refuse to perform functions that are against their religious or ethical convictions. I'm not sure the free market would have a huge effect, but if it did that would be the consequence of integrity. Living what one believes is not necessarily easy.
5in9years

 
At 11:45 PM, Anonymous Maayan said...

Sure, they should have that right. And their employer should have the right to fire them for not doing their job.

Should a Christian Scientist be allowed to work in a pharmacy, dispensing absolutely no medications, because they violate his "religious or ethical convictions"? No? I didn't think so.

 
At 1:31 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Do you disallow any moral objection in the workplace? I'm a L&D nurse by profession. As a prolife person I wouldn't apply for a job in an abortion clinic. Should I be forced to participate in elective terminations on my L&D unit? I have a right both to work and to practice my religion. It would be unreasonable for a Christian Scientist to work as a pharmacist. It isn't unreasonable for people who believe human life is sacred and begins at fertilization to be pharmacists, and it is religious discrimination to make dispensing abortifacient drugs a requirement of their job.
5in9years

 
At 3:37 PM, Blogger ema said...

5in9years,

Do you disallow any moral objection in the workplace?

No, as long as it doesn't interfere with proper patient care [my line in the sand].

Should I be forced to participate in elective terminations on my L&D unit?

By "elective terminations" I take it you mean terminations for medical indications, since strictly ETOPs aren't done on L&D? In any case, no you shouldn't participate, if other personnel is available. Otherwise, in my opinion, you shouldn't be "forced" to participate; you should want to participate because your patient needs you.

It isn't unreasonable for people who believe human life is sacred and begins at fertilization to be pharmacists, it is religious discrimination to make dispensing abortifacient drugs a requirement of their job.

Personal belief shouldn't disqualify one from becoming a pharmacist. Dispensing drugs according to personal beliefs (as opposed to the drug's indications/patient's medical need) should. Being sanctioned for not dispensing abortifacient drugs when indicated is not religious discrimination; it's being disciplined for not performing your job. [In other words, our job requirements are defined by the patient's medical needs, not our personal/religious beliefs.]

 

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home